A few years ago I found myself wanting a way to connect with my friends more often. Everyone is busy with work and life. And it was frustrating not having a quality way to connect and maintain friendships. Social media and the occasional text or message exchange doesn’t cut it. I craved meaningful connections with the people I cared about.

I began with my interests. More than two decades ago I took philosophy and literature classes in college. These were some of my favorite classes. Since then, philosophy and big ideas and human issues have enamored me. …


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In 2020, a newcomer to LinkedIn’s global list of the most in-demand skills is emotional intelligence.

According to one definition in the Cambridge Dictionary, emotional intelligence is “the ability to understand and control your feelings, and to understand the feelings of others and suitably react to them.”

A practical example of where emotional intelligence is useful is how we ask for, give, and receive feedback. Especially because a common reaction in us is to become defensive when given feedback.

Recently, to expand my knowledge and skills in this area, I attended The Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School’s Learning…


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To be effective in their role, developers need to learn how to work productively with their peers and the lead developer.

An important piece of this is learning the ropes on how to make pull requests that are easy to review.

What follows are three ways to make them better for the benefit of the people that review them. If you follow these tips, you’ll collaborate more effectively and demonstrate more competence and value.

1 — Add comments that answer “What does it do?” as a quick reference for the people who will review your code.

This is where having empathy can come in handy. Before you commit the code you’ve just written, ask yourself: “Would it be easy for me to…


man’s hand holding key
man’s hand holding key
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As a software developer at Nucleus Security, I completed the Building Secure Software Series training provided by KnowBe4.

Developers are the first line of defense when it comes to cybersecurity. Our awareness and abilities to use secure programming practices can establish a software application’s foundation that is resilient to an attack by malicious actors.

There is no shortage of reports in the mainstream media on the frequency and impact of successful cyber attacks. We all know that they can have very expensive consequences on organizations large and small, so I won’t spend any time on that here.

The good news…


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Some months ago, I started a new position as a software developer at Nucleus Security.

Nucleus has a cybersecurity SaaS (Software as a Service) that helps information security analysts streamline and add automation and better reporting to a complicated and, apparently, often hellacious process called Vulnerability Management.

Our app’s codebase is large. As I’ve been learning my way around it, I picked up a few clever ways from my own discoveries and my teammates’ insights to quickly find the lines of codes related to whatever issue or bug that’s assigned to me.

#1 — Use text in the UI and the search feature in your IDE

A quick n’ dirty way to find the…

Adam Dudley

Software developer with a startup background. I dig Florida 🏝, philosophy 🤔, tech, books 📚, the beach, and yoga 🧘🏻‍♂️. Life’s too short for bad coffee ☕️!

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